Dysmenorrhea as a Risk Factor for Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Christopher Atsaboghena Enakpene, Mudar Dalloul, Carla Petterkin-Caldwell, Jenny Anopa, Ozgul Muneyyirci-Delale

Abstract


Background: The aims of the study were to assess the association of dysmenorrhea and hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and to determine other factors that may influence its onset and severity.

Methods: This is a prospective case-control IRB approved study of 344 consecutive singleton pregnant women with and without hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnancy from February 2011 to April 2012. The association between HG and dysmenorrhea in adolescent and adult was examined using Pearson’s Chi-square with Yates correlation, Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Bivariate analysis and odd ratios (ORs) were calculated to evaluate the strength of their association, and multivariate logistic regression analysis while correcting for confounders. P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: A total of 344 consecutive singleton pregnant women were recruited. Significant association was found between HG and adolescent dysmenorrhea: 77.8% versus 43.4% of controls (P < 0.0001, OR: 4.6, 95% CI: 2.3 - 8.9). Also, there was a significant association between HG and adult dysmenorrhea: 76.4% versus 38.1% controls (P < 0.0001, OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 2.7 - 10.2). The association of severe adolescent and adult dysmenorrhea with HG was stronger (P < 0.0001, OR: 8.8, 95% CI: 3.9 - 19.9 and P < 0.0001, OR: 12.2, 95% CI: 5.0 - 29.7 respectively). There was a modest association with moderate dysmenorrhea (P = 0.004, OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.4 - 6.9) which was not sustained but no associations were found between HG and all mild dysmenorrhea of both adolescent and adult.

Conclusion: This study found an association between adolescent and adult dysmenorrhea and HG. These associations were stronger with severe dysmenorrhea.




J Clin Gynecol Obstet. 2015;4(4):283-289
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14740/jcgo356w


Keywords


Dysmenorrhea; Hyperemesis gravidarum; Adolescent; Adult; Onset; Severity

Full Text: HTML PDF
 

Browse  Journals  

     

Journal of Clinical Medicine Research

Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Journal of Clinical Gynecology and Obstetrics

World Journal of Oncology

Gastroenterology Research

Journal of Hematology

Journal of Medical Cases

Journal of Current Surgery

Clinical Infection and Immunity

Cardiology Research

World Journal of Nephrology and Urology

Cellular and Molecular Medicine Research

Journal of Neurology Research

International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics

 

 

 

 

 

Journal of Clinical Gynecology and Obstetrics, quarterly, ISSN 1927-1271 (print), 1927-128X (online), published by Elmer Press Inc.                     
The content of this site is intended for health care professionals.
This is an open-access journal, the authors retain the copyright, the journal is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Creative Commons Attribution license (Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International CC-BY-NC 4.0)


This journal follows the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommendations for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals,
the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) guidelines, and the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing.

website: www.jcgo.org   editorial contact: editor@jcgo.org
Address: 9225 Leslie Street, Suite 201, Richmond Hill, Ontario, L4B 3H6, Canada

© Elmer Press Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the published articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of the editors and Elmer Press Inc. This website is provided for medical research and informational purposes only and does not constitute any medical advice or professional services. The information provided in this journal should not be used for diagnosis and treatment, those seeking medical advice should always consult with a licensed physician.